The Discourse of Human Rights in China Historical and Ideological Perspectives by Robert Weatherley

Cover of: The Discourse of Human Rights in China | Robert Weatherley

Published by Palgrave Macmillan .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Government - Comparative,
  • Political Freedom & Security - Civil Rights,
  • Political Freedom & Security - Human Rights,
  • Political Science / Civil Rights,
  • Political Science-Government - Comparative,
  • Political Science-Political Freedom & Security - Human Rights,
  • Political And Civil Rights,
  • Political Doctrines,
  • Political Science,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • China,
  • Human rights,
  • Ideology,
  • History: World,
  • Politics/International Relations

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages200
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10387507M
ISBN 100312222815
ISBN 109780312222819

Download The Discourse of Human Rights in China

However, in contrast to the majority of the literature which focuses on alleged Chinese abuses of human rights, the author examines the emergence and evolution of a Chinese conception of rights, paying attention to the impact of Confucianism, Republicanism, and Marxism on this by: Examines the contentious subject of human rights in China.

However, in contrast to the majority of the literature which focuses on alleged Chinese abuses of human rights, the author examines the emergence and evolution of a Chinese conception of rights, paying attention to the impact of Confucianism, Republicanism and Marxism on this : R.

Weatherley. Robert Weatherley examines the emergence and evolution of the idea of rights in China, and then assesses both the degree to which Chinese rights thinking genuinely differs from its Western. Examines the contentious subject of human rights in China.

However, in contrast to the majority of the literature which focuses on alleged Chinese abuses of human rights, the author examines the emergence and evolution of a Chinese conception of rights, paying attention to the impact of Confucianism, Republicanism and Marxism on this conception.

The present-day human rights discourse in China was sparked by the Tiananmen Square Incident inas the outside world suddenly increased its pressure on the Chinese regime.

In response, the government published the Human Rights in China white paper in This paper looks at China’s behavior at the United Nations, including seven specific votes at the U.N.

Human Rights Council from that illustrate both of these Chinese goals, as well as. Description: Tracing the concept of human rights in Chinese political discourse since the late Qing dynasty, this comprehensive history convincingly demonstrates that—contrary to conventional wisdom—there has been a vibrant debate on human rights throughout the twentieth century.

The essay proceeds to an analysis of the role of ideas, identity-politics and perceptions in EU-China human rights discussions and examines how EU China foreign policy can be understood to be constructed around some key elements and frameworks (‘identities’, ‘pathways’).

Examines the contentious subject of human rights in China. However, in contrast to the majority of the literature which focuses on alleged Chinese abuses of human rights, the author examines the emergence and evolution of a Chinese conception of rights, paying attention to the impact of Confucianism, Republicanism and Marxism on this conception.3/5(1).

Review of The Discourse of Human Rights in China by Robert Weatherley Article (PDF Available) in The Journal of Asian Studies 59(3) January with 17 Reads How we measure 'reads'. This book is a compelling examination of the theoretical discourse on rights and its relationship with ideas, institutions and practices in the Indian context.

By engaging with the crucial categories of class, caste, gender, region and religion, it draws attention to the contradictions and contestations in the arena of rights and entitlements. The chapters by eminent experts provide deep.

This section, which engages critically with rights discourse, Human rights then, to extend Rancière’s metaphor, is, at least in some ways, the riot gear of the police. In this reading.

The non-Western world is alienated in a process where the use of human rights discourse elevates the power of those capable of defining its meaning. Capacity to Conceal Other Motivations. A second concern related to human rights discourse is the extent to which it is used as a cover for geopolitical or strategic motivations in policy making.

This week Dr. Stacey Links joins Eric & Cobus from Amsterdam to discuss her research in the role that human rights plays within the broader China-Africa relationship. Stacey, a South African native, recently completed her Ph.D. on the subject at the University of.

Tracing the concept of human rights in Chinese political discourse since the late Qing dynasty, this comprehensive history convincingly demonstrates that-contrary to conventional wisdom-there has been a vibrant debate on human rights throughout the twentieth century.

Drawing on little-known sources, Marina Svensson argues that the concept of human rights was invoked by the Chinese people well 3/5(3). Debating Human Rights in China: A Conceptual and Political History. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, E-mail Citation» This book traces the concept of human rights in Chinese political discourse since the late Qing dynasty until Get this from a library.

The discourse of human rights in China: historical and ideological perspectives. [Robert Weatherley] -- There can be few countries in the world that have faced more intense external criticism of their human rights record than the People's Republic of China.

Indeed, in. Marina Svensson has written a sophisticated, nuanced, complex history of human rights discource in China in the twentieth century. As she has argued and proven with her in-depth research, human rights discourse is not alien to China., Journal of Asian Studies The book is rich in details, comprehensive in scope and careful in its by:   However, in contrast to the majority of the literature which focuses on alleged Chinese abuses of human rights, the author examines the emergence and evolution of a Chinese conception of rights, paying attention to the impact of Confucianism, Republicanism, and Marxism on this conception%().

Human Rights & International Legal Discourse is a peer-reviewed law journal that focuses on the interplay between human rights law and international law. It is designed to encourage the critical study of the increasing influence of human rights law on international legal discourse.

In addition to. The U.S.-China Human Rights Dialogue, scheduled for Augustwill be held during what is widely viewed as the harshest crackdown in China since While China is a powerful global player that the United States needs to engage with on shared security and trade interests, this is a crucial.

The book examines where the themes and concerns of key modern theologians—Karl Rahner, J. Metz, Jon Sobrino, and Ignacio Ellacuría—converge with the themes and concerns of those committed to the advancement of human rights.

The New York Times attempts to project the notion of natural rights as universal truth, whereas People's Daily defines human rights as a process of development to counter Western condemnation as well as to justify rights abuses in China.

The struggle over articulation is also a manifestation of the hierarchy of discourse. importance placed on human rights, especially when it comes to intervention and interference, it seems inadequate that the discourse has not undergone greater scrutiny. In this essay, I will seek to analyze the human rights discourse, particularly from the viewpoint that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a Western creation.

Tracing the concept of human rights in Chinese political discourse since the late Qing dynasty, this comprehensive history convincingly demonstrates that--contrary to conventional wisdom--there has been a vibrant debate on human rights throughout the twentieth century.

Drawing on little-known sources, Marina Svensson argues that the concept of human rights was invoked by the Chinese people 3/5(1). The main purpose of this book is to justify and explore theological engagement with human rights. Regan illustrates how that engagement is both ecumenical and diverse, citing the emerging engagement with human rights discourse by evangelical theologians in response to the War on Terror.

In India, the Dharma of the Vedic period and in China, the jurisprudence of Lao-Tze and Confucius protected rights. In the West, a number of rights, bearing some semblance to what we call civil and political rights today, were available to a section Chapter-1I: Human Rights Discourse in.

detailed intellectual history of the evolution of human-rights discourse in China over the last several hundred years. I will use Angle's book as a platform for consideration of a number of issues regarding the role of philosophy, history, and power politics in relation to human rights in China and elsewhere.

In the case of China, the trend in human rights studies is away from purely theoretical concerns and toward an analysis of Chinese institutions. Across the board, many newer rights surfaced, including the rights of the handicapped, environmental rights, and the rights of AIDS victims.

Interestingly, few authors highlighted government writings. With this view in mind, the content of China’s human rights discourse is very rich; in addition to the human rights concepts contained in traditional Chinese culture, it also involves China’s significant contribution to the process of constructing the international human rights system and the great practice of the Chinese human rights cause.

Human Duties And The Limits Of Human Rights Discourse Download book Human Duties And The Limits Of Human Rights Discourse. PDF book with title Human Duties And The Limits Of Human Rights Discourse by Eric Robert Boot suitable to read on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Serious damage to the cause of human rights and democratic reform in East Asia could certainly be done if one simply denied the moral significance of culture, dismissing culture s role in inspiring and motivating sustained commitments to the implementation of democracy, human rights, or for that matter, any moral/political norms.

For most of this decade, debate on China policy in the United States has centered on whether human rights is an appropriate objective, rather than on the efficacy of the U.S.

approach to rights. Human rights are moral principles or norms that describe certain standards of human behaviour and are regularly protected as natural and legal rights in municipal and international law. They are commonly understood as inalienable, fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being" and which are "inherent in all human beings", regardless of.

This book is an important contribution to an ongoing discussion among scholars interested in identity politics in late nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century China. It has already resulted in the formation of research conferences, workshops, and panel presentations in the United States, Hong Kong, Australia, Taiwan and the People's Republic of China on the problem of race and culture in.

Book Description. In her innovative study of human rights discourse, Lena Khor takes up the prevailing concern by scholars who charge that the globalization of human rights discourse is becoming yet another form of cultural, legal, and political imperialism imposed from above by an international human rights regime based in the Global North.

Amnesty International. “China, violations of human rights: prisoners of conscience and the death penalty in the People’s Republic of China”. Ed William Meyers. London, U.K China Country Report on Human Rights Practices for Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights. Despite the fact that China’s overall GDP ranks second in the world, its GDP per capita and Human Development Index (HDI) value stand closer to the levels of developing countries than developed.

l Human Rights Concepts and Discourse 3 A. Global Snapshots 3 B. The Global Framework for Contemporary Human Rights Discourse: Capital Punishment, lnteract10ns among States, Exceptionalism 17 l.

The Rapidly Changing Law on Capital Punishment 18 2. Should National Courts Look to Foreign Decisions and International. Without disagreeing with the central thesis that our HR discourse is narrow and may be sometimes used to serve western political ideologies, many of the universal human rights recognised today were actually framed and synthesised with major input from China, India and thinkers from the southern hemisphere.

part of the problem perhaps is that we. The use of “human rights” in English-language books has increased fold sinceand is used today times more often than terms such as “constitutional rights” and “natural.In her innovative study of human rights discourse, Lena Khor takes up the prevailing concern by scholars who charge that the globalization of human rights discourse is becoming yet another form of cultural, legal, and political imperialism imposed from above by an international human rights regime based in the Global North.North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland, USA +1 () [email protected] © Project MUSE.

Produced by Johns Hopkins University .

1098 views Wednesday, November 11, 2020